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Discussion: Monotheism Among "Primitive" Peoples - Dr. Umar Faruq Abd-Allah

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    juin 2014
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    France
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    Par défaut Monotheism Among "Primitive" Peoples - Dr. Umar Faruq Abd-Allah

    اَلحَمدُلِلهِ رَبِ العَلَمِينَ ؕ وَالصَّلَوةُ وَ السَّلَامُ عَلَى سَيِـّـدِ المُرسَلِين
    اَمَّا بَعدُ فَاَعُوذُ بِاللهِ مِنَ الشَّيطَنِ الرَّجِيمِ
    بِسمِ اللهِ الرَّحمَنِ الرَّحِيم


    السلام عليكم ورحمة الله تعالى وبركاته

    Asalamu 3alaykum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh







    *






    Monotheism Among "Primitive" Peoples



    Dr. Umar Faruq Abd-Allah








    "Schmidt suggested that there had been a primitive monotheism before men and women had started to worship a number of gods. Originally they had acknowledge only one Supreme Deity, who had created the world and governed human affairs from afar."


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    juin 2014
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    France
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    Par défaut

    Most of the tribal people in Andaman and Nicobar Islands believe in a religion that can be described as a form of monotheistic Animism. The tribal people of these islands believe that Paluga is the only deity and is responsible for everything happening on Earth. The faith of the Andamanese teaches that Paluga resides on the Andaman and Nicobar Islands' Saddle Peak. People try to avoid any action that might displease Paluga. People belonging to this religion believe in the presence of souls, ghosts, and spirits. People of this religion put a lot of emphasis on dreams. They let dreams decide different courses of action in their lives.

    It seems they lived between 30,000 to 70,000 isolated from the rest of the world







    Description :

    For their own protection, you are not allowed to meet them. For tens of thousands of years, the Jarawa have been self-sufficient hunter-gatherers, living in harmony with nature on India’s Andaman Islands. But their way of life was turned upside down with the mass arrival of tourists at the start of the 2000s. Disturbing reports document "human safaris", sexual abuse of women, as well as the introduction of alcohol and tobacco. Our reporter went to meet this population, who risk dying out. Deep in the Indian Ocean, a few hundred kilometres from India, the Andaman Islands archipelago has become the El Dorado of the Indian middle class. Each year, thousands of tourists enjoy the coral beaches of this little corner of paradise on Earth with its stunning landscape. It is also a strategic location, where the government has chosen to build the Indian Ocean’s largest port. But this spectacular economic development comes at the expense of the Afro-Asian peoples who live in the archipelago and who are among the last primitive tribes on the planet.


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